My Photos

October 24, 2011

I made a belt!

Filed under: Uncategorized — megs @ 12:25 am

https://carvingleather.wordpress.com/2011/10/23/steampunk-belt/

October 3, 2011

‘Cause my hat needs to see…

Filed under: Uncategorized — megs @ 7:16 pm

So I’m currently unemployed, and often bored, and the combination has me turning to crafts.  I decided to make a pair of steampunk goggles.

I looked at a bunch of different pictures on line, and then I found this page (by the lady who writes Cake Wreks!) with details on how to make a nifty pair.   I liked the chunky look of the eye pieces, so I decided to give it a go.  I followed most of the given instructions, with some deviations.

The first big deviation has to do with the leather.  Rather than go for the plain brown featured on the page, I put my leathercrafting powers to good use.

I bought a bag of scrap pieces from Tandy, and found two pieces that were big enough to form the eye cups.  Then I used my geometric shape tool to give the leather the same repeating square pattern I used on my flask.   I used a tool called a four-prong lacing chisel (it looks like a wide dinner fork that means business) to cut holes for stitching.   The last steps were dying the pieces brown and applying finisher.

Then, I used some scrap pieces of soft upholstery leather to form a cushion around the eye cups.

I folded the leather over a pipe cleaner to make the edge look more rounded.

Next, I wrapped the leather pieces around the pipes, and then glued and stitched them into place.

I stitched on more upholstery leather for the band:

And added a shiny brass buckle.

I decided to use brass mesh for the lenses.  Brass mesh, I found out, was about $60 a roll.  I bought a small section of this stuff instead, and decided to spray paint it.

I discovered a small problem with the mesh – other people could look back up the goggles.  They could see the stitching, and the screws holding on the nose bridge.  I thought it looked messy.  Also, I was concerned that the color of the mesh wouldn’t show up well when backed by gaping nothing.   So I took another tip from the EPBOT instructions, and cut some lens backing out of a report cover.

The plastic is both opaque and textured – nobody is going to see anything through there.  That works for me, because I don’t need to see through them, either.   Unless I decide to get some prescription lenses cut for these goggles, I need to wear my glasses to get around.

The last thing to do was spray paint the mesh, the screw-on eye pieces and the bit of metal for the nose bridge (I used the same stuff EPBOT did).  And here were the results:

The screw-on cups are painted antique brass.  The screens and nose piece are painted shiny gold/brass.

Side view:

The EPBOT instructions suggested putting some decorative brass pieces on the sides.   I ordered some, but I decided I like the raw look of the stitching better.

Top view:

The length of the eye pieces makes the goggles a little unwieldy. I might end up wearing them around my neck so they don’t over balance my hat.

Next project – finish construction of my lightbulb-based ray gun.